Will employer’s breach of contract release employee from post employment restraints?

Where an employer breaches a contract of employment in a fundamental and serious way, (for example by wrongfully dismissing an employee for misconduct when there ware no sufficient grounds to do so) does a restraint of trade survive and continue to be binding upon the former employee?
The answer, it seems, depends upon whether the employer’s conduct can be regarded as a repudiation of the contract. In that event, it is sometimes said, the common law has the effecet that the conduct of the employer constitutes grounds which allow the employee, as the innocent party to either insist on performance, or acknowledge the repudiation and discharge him or herself from any further obligation under the contract.
If an innocent party chooses to discharge themselves from the contract, they may be able to sue the defaulting party for damages. Alternatively, if the innocent party chooses to insist on performance, then the contract will still be on foot and all of the obligations and liabilities will still be applicable.
What an action of repudiation does, is allow an innocent party to either insist on performance, or acknowledge the repudiation and discharge him or herself from any further obligation under the contract.
If an innocent party chooses to discharge themselves from the contract, they may be able to sue the defaulting party for damages. Alternatively, if the innocent party chooses to insist on performance, then the contract will still be on foot and all of the obligations and liabilities will still be applicable